Adrian Pearsall Coffee Table

Adrian Pearsall Coffee Table

Adrian Pearsall (USA, 1925-2011) Learn More About Adrian Pearsall Adrian Pearsall (USA, 1925-2011) Adrian Pearsall designed some of the most exuberant and expressive American furniture of the 1950s and ’60s. For verve and vivacity of form, he surpasses even Vladimir Kagan — whose work is the emblem of swinging, sexy mid-20th century modernism. Pearsall gave his imagination free rein, and his flamboyant, eye-catching styles are icons of what has become known as “Atomic Age” design.      Pearsall studied architectural engineering at the University of Illinois before opening his Pennsylvania furniture company, Craft Associates, in 1952, and that training shows in many designs. A Pearsall trademark, for example, is a lounge chair with an exceptionally tall, trapezoidal back, which give the pieces a skyscraper-like silhouette. Pearsall also had a talent for so-called “gondola” sofas — long, low-slung pieces with upswept ends. Many of Pearsall’s sofas and chairs are supported not by legs, but on gently arced walnut skids.      Pearsall also had a gift for tables, in particular glass-topped side and coffee tables with frames that have the look of an Alexander Calder stabile. As you will see from the offerings on these pages, Adrian Pearsall had flair, and his work adds an attention-getting, sculptural exclamation point to any décor.
adrian pearsall coffee table 1

Adrian Pearsall Coffee Table

Adrian Pearsall (USA, 1925-2011) Adrian Pearsall designed some of the most exuberant and expressive American furniture of the 1950s and ’60s. For verve and vivacity of form, he surpasses even Vladimir Kagan — whose work is the emblem of swinging, sexy mid-20th century modernism. Pearsall gave his imagination free rein, and his flamboyant, eye-catching styles are icons of what has become known as “Atomic Age” design.      Pearsall studied architectural engineering at the University of Illinois before opening his Pennsylvania furniture company, Craft Associates, in 1952, and that training shows in many designs. A Pearsall trademark, for example, is a lounge chair with an exceptionally tall, trapezoidal back, which give the pieces a skyscraper-like silhouette. Pearsall also had a talent for so-called “gondola” sofas — long, low-slung pieces with upswept ends. Many of Pearsall’s sofas and chairs are supported not by legs, but on gently arced walnut skids.      Pearsall also had a gift for tables, in particular glass-topped side and coffee tables with frames that have the look of an Alexander Calder stabile. As you will see from the offerings on these pages, Adrian Pearsall had flair, and his work adds an attention-getting, sculptural exclamation point to any décor.
adrian pearsall coffee table 2

Adrian Pearsall Coffee Table

Adrian Pearsall designed some of the most exuberant and expressive American furniture of the 1950s and ’60s. For verve and vivacity of form, he surpasses even Vladimir Kagan — whose work is the emblem of swinging, sexy mid-20th century modernism. Pearsall gave his imagination free rein, and his flamboyant, eye-catching styles are icons of what has become known as “Atomic Age” design.      Pearsall studied architectural engineering at the University of Illinois before opening his Pennsylvania furniture company, Craft Associates, in 1952, and that training shows in many designs. A Pearsall trademark, for example, is a lounge chair with an exceptionally tall, trapezoidal back, which give the pieces a skyscraper-like silhouette. Pearsall also had a talent for so-called “gondola” sofas — long, low-slung pieces with upswept ends. Many of Pearsall’s sofas and chairs are supported not by legs, but on gently arced walnut skids.      Pearsall also had a gift for tables, in particular glass-topped side and coffee tables with frames that have the look of an Alexander Calder stabile. As you will see from the offerings on these pages, Adrian Pearsall had flair, and his work adds an attention-getting, sculptural exclamation point to any décor.
adrian pearsall coffee table 3

Adrian Pearsall Coffee Table

APPRAISER: And I think what Vladimir Kagan was saying to me was that he wished he had designed it, because it was much more successful. And, if anything, this table sort of out-Kaganed Kagan. And Adrian Pearsall was a great designer in his own right. He was a contemporary of Vladimir Kagan. He started this company in 1952, and was taking elements of different designers. And he had an uncanny knack for what the market wanted and what would sell. When it was originally designed, it was such a bestseller for the company that he put it on his letterhead. So on his letterhead, where it says, “Craft Associates, from the desk of Adrian Pearsall” on his letterhead, there’s a little small logo in the corner, of this table. Now, the good news is that Adrian Pearsall’s work is becoming very popular. And there’s a lot of collectors who are just starting to seek it out. So it’s on the rise, it’s going up in value. Craft Associates was producing this type of table between the mid-1950s and the mid-1960s. This example is in fantastic condition. The solid walnut base is nicely oiled, hasn’t been refinished or repainted, really is a great survivor. How have you used it all these years?
adrian pearsall coffee table 4

Adrian Pearsall Coffee Table

     Pearsall studied architectural engineering at the University of Illinois before opening his Pennsylvania furniture company, Craft Associates, in 1952, and that training shows in many designs. A Pearsall trademark, for example, is a lounge chair with an exceptionally tall, trapezoidal back, which give the pieces a skyscraper-like silhouette. Pearsall also had a talent for so-called “gondola” sofas — long, low-slung pieces with upswept ends. Many of Pearsall’s sofas and chairs are supported not by legs, but on gently arced walnut skids.
adrian pearsall coffee table 5

Adrian Pearsall Coffee Table

     Pearsall also had a gift for tables, in particular glass-topped side and coffee tables with frames that have the look of an Alexander Calder stabile. As you will see from the offerings on these pages, Adrian Pearsall had flair, and his work adds an attention-getting, sculptural exclamation point to any décor.
adrian pearsall coffee table 6

Adrian Pearsall Coffee Table

Recent years have seen a heightened interest in the life and works of Adrian Pearsall, a seemingly little-known mid-century modern furniture designer, enthusiastic yachtsman and philanthropist. Pearsall’s catalogue of work is extensive, and as he allowed time for custom work that was shipped worldwide, constructing a complete list of all of his truly inspired designs is almost impossible. See what we’ve got in store here at Chairish!
adrian pearsall coffee table 7

Adrian Pearsall Coffee Table

Adrian Pearsall designed some of the most exuberant and expressive American furniture of the 1950s and ’60s. For verve and vivacity of form, he surpasses even Vladimir Kagan — whose work is the emblem of swinging, sexy mid-20th century modernism. Pearsall gave his imagination free rein, and his flamboyant, eye-catching styles are icons of what has become known as “Atomic Age” design.
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Stunning pair of lounge chairs by Adrian Pearsall for Craft Associates, model 2325-C, circa 1960s. Walnut frames fully restored, newly upholstered in taupe cotton velvet.
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Great Pearsall stand, not seen very often. Base is medium to light walnut color with glass top. The glass has some scuffs and scratches, but no chips.
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APPRAISER: More than anything, this table and tables like this have come to be the emblem of mid-century modern. Mid-century modern has become this buzzword, and also sometimes referred to as the Atomic Age. This kind of kidney bean-shaped glass top, an asymmetrical base, with these kind of soaring cantilevered arms are very emblematic of the entire period. I’ve got some good news and some bad news.